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20131101
20131101
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, a new book looks at his little known legacy as a ground- breaking foreign-policy president. >> lincoln had to deal with a series of crises over the course of his presidency from france, from britain, from spain, even russian ships showed up off the atlantic coast. >> ifill: those are just some of the stories we're covering on tonight's "pbs newshour." >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: ♪ ♪ moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> woodruff: israel has launched new air strikes into syria. u.s. security officials say the attack came after nightfall, in the syrian port city of latakia after nightfall. the target was said to be russian-made, surface-to-ai
friendship ith other countries. if you follow iraq's foreign policy, you would see that the iraqis think independently and not according to the interest of any others. we have a partnership an agreement with the united states. this is something some other countries do not like. that we like it, this is what matters. be believed to have a strong relation within the united states. if others do not agree, it is their problem. they cannot impose anything on the iraqis. if they want to be our friends our friendship does not impose on us being enemies of others. >> how do you respond to critics -- this is not coming from me, but a question from someone else -- say you are consolidating power and this has adversely affected iraq's democratic process? >> the constitution and ruling in iraq gives prerogative. this is something i state clearly. let me know when i act in an unconstitutional way. if i act in a way that is not acceptable to some of our partners, as long as i am committing to respecting the constitution and as long as i use my prerogative in a constitutional way, there should ot be a
. because on issues of taxation or fiscal policy or foreign policy. what you did with how we dealt with central america and nicaragua. today they disagree because they fight. because they're fighting with each other, they have to disagree on every single thing. it's anything that's got obama's jersey on it has to be slain. . >> and when we did the paperback version of the book just out, which we could've titled it's even worse than it was from when the book originally came out. i had a little bit of hope after the 2012 election when the permanent campaign might die down a little bit that it would get better. but it hasn't. but it's gotten worse than it was. and it really is an attempt to delegitimize the president and a party. but it's also that the core of the republican party, the leadership, there are no moderates anymore. the conservatives, the ones that you wrote about now have been eclipsed by the radicals. that's the difference. the republican party is -- >> like john cornyn, scared to death of ted cruz and he's trying to act like him. let me ask you a question that sounds l
intentions, what they call leadership intentions, foreign policy objectives, human rights and then threats of the financial system. i find the last one to the financial system. what threats to the financial system does the vatican pose? >> that's a bit of a head scratcher because it doesn't have a particularly large amount of economic clout. occasionally they make comments about policy suggestion for how to help the world economy and how to help the world develop particularly in the developing world but it doesn't wield a lot of financial power. it isn't that big financially. it does have an institute. now, there's the institute for the works of religion which is kind of a bank that's set up to help coordinate charitable activities and currently the pope -- both pope francis and pope benedict had been working to kind of clean up some of the activity and put the vatican bank in a more rigorous footing. but it's a small bank in the scale of things. and so i don't really know what kind of threats they would imagine the holy sea would pose. >> it's very, very interesting i appreciate you givin
foreign relations committee. fact, he has been a leader and virtually every foreign- policy issue for the united states over the past three decades. this year, he became the first sitting chairman of that committee in over a century to become secretary of state. two weeks ago, i was honored to travel to asia with senator where-- secretary kerry you push key initiatives like the chance to civic -- trans-p acific partnership. he has knowledge and global reach in this leader said position -- leadership position. ladies and gentlemen, let's give a warm welcome to a national hero, and then he would dedicate his life to serve the united states in a tireless and can do dealing with the tough issues that face our world. lease help me welcome my friend secretary of state, john kerry. [applause] >> good morning. thank you. there's a very much. thank you for an extraordinary introduction. based on the introduction, i accept the nomination. [laughter] only kidding. i'm out of that now. you, a couple of months before i was out of the job of being secretary stay, i'm still serving and the u.s.
views, thank you. >> thank you. lou: much more on the president's foreign policy, failures we take up with the a-team, stay with us, much more ahead. >> laughingstock. that is what leading republican senator john boa boar aso calls kathleen sebelius, he is next. so i can reach ally bank 24/7, but there are no branches? 24/7. i'm sorry, i'm just really reluctant to try new things. really? what's wrong with trying new things? look! mommy's new vacuum! (cat screech) you feel that in your muscles? i do... drink water. it's a long story. well, not having branches let's us give you great rates and service. i'd like that. a new way to bank. a better way to save. ally bank. your money needs an ally. once wrote something on a sheet of paper and placed it in his factory for all to see. ♪ four simple words where the meaning has never been lost. the challenge always accepted. and the calling forever answered. ♪ introducing the all-new 2014 s-class. mercedes-benz. the best or nothing. lou: a third gun manufacturing company has announced it is leaving the state of new york over governor andrew
. and finally, turn to what is the -- what do the implications of this an how we implement foreign policy. with that sort of an overarching on the topic i like to see us cover. i'm going it start with the first question on the threat we face and why we need -- feel we need security. if there are no benefits with e wouldn't have be having the discussion. with that, george, i would like to turn to you. how has the threat of terrorism changed over the past decade and how have our security and -- it's changed, henry, i think a few relatively significant ways. first, it is a threat than it was ten to fifteen years ago. it's not necessarily aligned bay group by ideology and other driving factors which may be complaint about how we are conducting ourselves in their view. secondly, the threat seems to progress at time very rapidly. what may appear to be a localized threat today perhaps in some obscure part of the world could in fact be on the doorstep tomorrow. lastly, it has significantly. they don't necessarily appear based on their actions and recent actions are indicators of that. that necess
strategy in the iranian foreign policy. the essential question is did sanctions work? >> it's difficult to come up with an explanation as to why it is in the presidential elections six of the seven candidates criticized the previous negotiator. unless there was some impact sanctions were having on the debate in iran. it's difficult to see why it is his focus on the economy would have been so successful unless the sanctions were having some impact in iran's economy. it's difficult to see why it is that after several years which iran seemed entirely uninterested in a nuclear deal we have a new nuclear negotiating team that is obviously interested in reaching a deal as quickly as possible. unless the sanctions were having some impact on iran. and i think one of the people whose opinion we should listen to in the matter is mr. -- who said repeatedly the sanction we're having a dramatic impact on iran. and it change and approach was necessary. so from the perspective of the obama administration, -- as i have written several monograph. the obama team from the beginning always thought the sanc
. lou: always good to talk with you. come back soon. much more on the president's foreign policy and its failures with the "a-team" next. stay with us. who is responsible for the obamacare mess? should obamacare be fixed or just scrub? for health and human services secretary michael leavitt joins us next. ♪ you make a great team. it's been that way since e day you met. but your erectile dysfunction - itld be a question of blood flow. cialis tadalafil for daily use helps you be ready anytime the moment's right. you cabe more confident in your ability to be ready. and the same cialis is the only daily ed tablet approved to treat ed and symptoms of bph like needing to go frequently or urgently. tell your doctor about all your medical conditions and medications, and ask if your heart is healthy enough for sexual activity. do not take cialis if you take nitrates for chest pain, as this may cause unsafe drop in blood pressure. do not drink alcohol in excess with cialis. side effects may include headache, upset stomach, delayed backache or muscle ache. to avoid long-term injury, seek immedte
are the implications of this on how we implement foreign policy. it serves as an overarching of the things i would like to see us cover. i would like to start with the first question on the rent we face and why we need security. if there are no benefits, we do not need security. how has the threat of terrorism changed over the past decade and how have our methods adaptive? >> it has changed in relatively significant ways. it is a far more diffuse threat than it was 10 or 15 years ago. it is not necessarily align to buy group, but principally by ideology and other driving fact there's, -- driving factors. secondly, the threat seems to progress at times very rapidly. what may appear to be a localized threat today could be on our doorstep tomorrow. lastly, they do not necessarily appear based on their actions in recent actions are indicators of that. big and complex attacks are their goal or their aim to accomplish their objectives. relatively small in comparison attacks that are relatively simple to put together and execute seem to be a preference. they have the same tools we all have to communicate in a
. this is beyond obama care. this is the whole economy and our foreign policy. >> but if there is no republican leader per se and there isn't. it's a divided party. who is going to tie it together? who is going to be the one to present it to the measure people? it can't be job boehner. nobody knows him, all right? it can't be him. you have got cruise. you have got rubio. you have got christie. christie is a governor though. i don't think is he going to do it. you have got rand paul. it's very hard to get a cohesive message out to the american people when you don't have a messenger. >> but i think what they can do legislatively is they can say, look, there is so much chaos on some levels with what they're claiming their policies are going to do that, frankly, our role is going to be to block what they are trying to do. an extension of obama care. they have got to do that. >> didn't work -- >> -- no, that didn't work, bill, on other things that obama tried. he tried to pivot today back to carbon and the green economy. if he tries any more stuff on that, the republicans have got to say, look, they
around the world with world leaders. in fact, -- every foreign policy issue for the united states over the past three decades. this year he became the first sitting chairman of that committee in over a century to become secretary of state. and just two weeks ago i was honored to travel to asia with senator kerry where we pushed forward key administration initiatives like the trans-pacific partnership. our nation is very lucky to have someone with secretary carries knowledge, and global reach in this leadership position. ladies and gentlemen, let's give a warm welcome to a national hero, a man who has dedicated his life to serve the united states and a tireless can do later who is tackling the tough global issues facing our world. lease help me welcome my friend, secretary of state, john kerry. [applause] >> good morning. thank you. thank you very, very much. thanks so much. thank you, penny, for an extraordinary introduction, and based on that introduction i accept the nomination. [laughter] only kidding. i'm out of that now. i'm out of that now. i'll tell you, about a couple months, b
it sooner? in foreign policy, doing the right thing is not the only thing. you also have to do the right thing at the right time. why did it take so long to reach this conclusion? and now we find ourselves in a situation where fighting on behalf of those who promote freedom and liberty and tolerance is harder than ever and may be impossible. why did we do this, but sooner? -- why did we not do this, but sooner? it is harder than ever and might be impossible. >> the syrian opposition from the beginning was atomized. that is how it survived the regime's oppression. there was no national leadership. it is very hard to build up something that itself is still very incoherent. it took a long time for the opposition coalition to come together. you are right, we only recognized it in december, 2012. but it was only formed in mid- november. we recognized it as the legitimate representative three weeks after it was established. we have reduced the syrian embassy to the officer. and frankly, that officer is there because a lot of the syrian americans here want a syrian task force and he is able --
this very important foreign-policy matter going forward. >> time for some fresh thinking in terms of u.s. policy in the post-pullout? >> we are focused on providing the necessary assistance to a iraq to help them combat terrorism as well as the broader assistance to provide through the strategic framework agreement. that encompasses not just the security relationship, but an economic and political relationship. part of this -- part of what a for has been going to many years now is the efforts to resolve the political differences and divisions within that country peacefully and through politics rather than through file it conflict. violent conflict. the forces of al qaeda have been trying to disrupt that throughout this time. it is important that in spite of the differences that exist politically in the iraq that the parties and groups continues to resolve their differences peacefully, which further isolates the activities that al qaeda and him and straights what they are for all to see, which terribleeking of violence on innocent civilians which is damaging to every iraqi. our systems
about the u.s. investment climate and the government policy on attracting foreign investment, some of those policies include immigration, the debt ceiling, and energy. it is moderated. [applause] >> good morning everyone. lou, thank you -- lew, thank you for your excellent remarks. thank you to both of them for their leadership. it has been outstanding for the subject matter we have before us these next few days. their insights as it applies to the business community are very valuable to all of us that are joining us today. we are off to a great start to what promises to be a gay -- great conference and agenda. thank you to all who has come great distances to be with us today. i am very pleased to announce our first panel that is entitled usa?hy select the perspectives on operating in the united states." this'll be a very informative and invaluable discussion. it is also my pleasure to introduce that moderator of this panel, an important member of president obama's white house team, valerie jarrett. a senior adviser to the president and a longtime confidant of the president. she ov
of democratic leaders on foreign policy in the senate. it was a real warning shot. it was a letter to obama but it was really a broadside against and it said he is doing a of things wrong and has not fulfilled his promises and his governing -- and he is governing as a sectarian warlord and the u.s. is not holding him to account for it. he is allowing too much influence by iran which is also shiite which is the same as his government. they called that a malign influence which is one of the stronger terms applied recently. concerns really are, as i laid out in the context of the apaches, that since 2011, al- maliki has promised a number of times to have an inclusive power-sharing government. one was nominally set up. by the account of john mccain and others who wrote that has set abouti to dismantle that government or undermine it. he is accompanied this trip by a sunni defense minister and a ministero foreign representing other blocs. is that that is just for show and that he really intends to continue to govern from a shiite-first perspective and so far, he has been able to essentially
. it was signed by the most influential republican and a couple democratic leaders on foreign policy in the senate and it was a real warning shot. it was a letter to obama but it was really a broadside against maliki and it said, you know, he's doing any number of things wrong. he's, he hasn't fulfilled previous promises. he is governing, these were not the his words but he is governing as a sectarian warlord and the u.s. is not holding him to account for it and he is allowing too much influence by next door iran which of course is also shiite as is he, as is his government-led coalition n fact they called that aid maligned influence which is one of the stronger terms applied recently. and the, the concerns really are, as i laid out in the context of the apaches, look, i mean, since 2011 maliki has promised any number of times to have a, inclusive power-sharing government. in fact one was nominally set up, by the, account of john mccain and others who wrote that letter. maliki hashn said about systematically either dismantling that government or undermining it. and although he is accompanied here
've abandoned them, as we have done egypt. it's an interesting foreign policy we're witnessing. lieutenant colonel allen west who fights for us, worked for us in washington and now a fox news contributor, thanks so much. >> thanks for having me, brian. >> next up, hey, parents, do your kids love mac and cheese? there is big changes coming and you need to know about it because they're going to eat it anyway. reality show husband bill rancic is running into the studio right now, he'll be in last place of the new york city marathon. wisest kid? we need a new recipe. let us consult the scroll of infinite deliciousness. perfect. [ wisest kid ] campbell's has the recipes kids love. so good! [ wisest kid ] at campbellskitchen.com. [ gong ] m'm! m'm! good! female narrator: the mattress price wars are ending soon the mattress price wars are ending soon at sleep train. we've challenged the manufacturers to offer even lower prices. now it's posturepedic versus beautyrest with big savings of up to $400 off. serta icomfort and tempur-pedic go head-to-head with three years' interest-free financing, plus
summit, ceos talk about the investment climate and the policies to attract foreign investment. some of those include immigration and energy. it is moderated by valerie jarrett. [applause] >> good morning, everyone. secretary lew, secretary pritzker, thank you so much for your very excellent remarks. and i want to thank both of them for their leadership. they have been outstanding, particularly for the subject matter that we have before us these next two days. i know that their insights, particularly as it applies to the business community, are very valuable to all of us that are joining us today. we're off to a great start to what promises to be a great conference with a packed agenda. thanks to all of you who have come great distances to be with us today. i am very pleased to announce our first panel, which is entitled why select the usa?: perspectives on investing and operating in the united states. this is going to be a very informative and valuable discussion and it is also my pleasure to introduce the moderator of this panel, an important member of president obama's white house
Search Results 0 to 22 of about 23 (some duplicates have been removed)

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